Mathematics

For decades, studies have shown that students who take advanced courses, particularly in math, generally achieve at higher levels, attend and finish college at higher rates and earn more as adults than their peers who take lower-level courses. Among the results:

"Finishing a course beyond the level of Algebra 2 more than doubles the odds that a student who enters postsecondary education will complete a bachelor's degree."
—Clifford Adelman, "Tools in the Toolbox," 1999 analysis of longitudinal data from the federal High School & Beyond survey.

"The sequence of math courses a student takes in high school is even more important than socioeconomic status in predicting a student's odds of finishing college."
—Clifford Adelman, "Tools in the Toolbox," 1999 analysis of longitudinal data from the federal High School & Beyond survey.

"More than half the workers in the highest-paying jobs (those earning more than $40,000 a year) have two or more credits at the Algebra 2 level or higher. That compared with 27 percent of workers earning $25,000 to $40,000 annually and 20 percent of those at the bottom of the earnings distribution."
—Anthony P. Carnevale and Donna M. Desrochers, Educational Testing Service analysis of data from the National Educational Longitudinal Survey.